Meetings & Information

MUST READ:
GET THE FACTS!
VOTE YES! TO END THE CASINO MESS!
Massachusetts Gam[bl]ing Commission

Check the Gambling Commission site for changes and updates:
http://www.mass.gov/gaming/

You may submit your comments to the commission at: mgccomments@state.ma.us




Sunday, September 14, 2014

You want this in your neighborhood...WHY?





Embezzlement cases soared in Connecticut after the casinos came. Police made 43 embezzlement arrests before the first casino opened, in 1991, and 214 in 2007. The state's increase was nearly 10 times the national average.

Drunk driving cases soared, too.

Norwich, for instance, had 129 drunk driving cases in 1992 and 252 in 2008. There were 37 in Montville in 1992 and 116 in 2007.

The state police barracks in Montville conducted far more drunk driving investigations - 2,313 between 2003 and 2007 - than any other barracks in the state. The next closest was Westbrook, with only 1,629 investigations.

Mohegan and Mashantucket ads: Gambling is bad

Publication: The Day
Published September 12. 2014

So the Mohegan Indians are now in the nail-biting stage of their bid to run a Boston casino.
Based on the early scoring, their prospects are not looking so good and they may well lose the bidding war to Las Vegas casino king Steve Wynn. They also got the bad news this week they should pony up another $100 million in equity in the project to stay in the game.
It looks likely that by this time next week, the Mohegans will be in the same boat as the Mashantucket Pequots: Running a big leveraged Connecticut casino that is about to be poached by leading industry players in Massachusetts.
Alas, it could soon be a sinking boat.
All those news stories about big casinos closing in Atlantic City should send a chill down spines here in eastern Connecticut, where a mainstay of the economy will soon take a big hit.
There is one more hope that things won't get too dire.
Casino opponents in Massachusetts have managed to put on the ballot for November voting a repeal question that would end Massachusetts' march toward full-scale casino gambling.
Maybe the Mashantuckets and Mohegans should get on board the anti-casino movement in the Bay State.
How about some clever advertising campaigns by the two Connecticut casino tribes, telling the people of Massachusetts how bad gambling could be for them.
Who would know better?
I might suggest an advertising campaign based on the 2009 study commissioned by the Connecticut General Assembly that catalogued many of the negative impacts the casinos have had in this state.
From increased road repairs to the cost of English as second language programs for schools teaching the children of casino workers, the report listed some things the tribes might want Massachusetts voters to think about in November.
Norwich Free Academy estimated its annual casino-related costs at $600,000 in the report. Montville reported then it was paying an additional $300,000 in language programs.
William W. Backus Hospital reported losing as much as $1 million in treating uninsured people from the casinos.
The report logged more suicides, accidents, drunk driving and crime, especially embezzlement, since the casinos opened.
Embezzlement cases soared in Connecticut after the casinos came. Police made 43 embezzlement arrests before the first casino opened, in 1991, and 214 in 2007. The state's increase was nearly 10 times the national average.
Drunk driving cases soared, too.
Norwich, for instance, had 129 drunk driving cases in 1992 and 252 in 2008. There were 37 in Montville in 1992 and 116 in 2007.
The state police barracks in Montville conducted far more drunk driving investigations - 2,313 between 2003 and 2007 - than any other barracks in the state. The next closest was Westbrook, with only 1,629 investigations.
Surely the marketing departments at the two Connecticut casinos could work up some catchy ads to run soon in Massachusetts. How about some, for instance, featuring mug shots of all those embezzlers caught after losing money on the gaming floors? Or maybe they could have billboards showing drunk drivers pulled over.
A catchy slogan? How about: Let Connecticut Keep Gambling! Casinos Feed Crime!
Ok, we may not see Connecticut's gaming tribes step into the Massachusetts casino referendum fray.
But I bet there will be a lot of crossed fingers and toes on the reservations here when Massachusetts voters go to the polls.
This is the opinion of David Collins
 
 
 

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Horseshoe Casino keeps $$$, Council used campaign donations to support a gambling addiction


Did you ever notice that the SLOT BARN that sucks law-abiding citizens into GAMBLING ADDICTION is not always named?

And the SLOT BARN gets to keep the $$$?





She used campaign donations to support a gambling addiction

Posted: Friday, September 12, 2014 5:07 pm



 
LINCOLN — Former State Sen. Brenda Council lost her license to practice law Friday after the Nebraska Supreme Court disbarred her for using campaign donations to support a gambling addiction.
 
The high court’s decision to impose its highest sanction on Council came after a court referee who reviewed the case recommended a temporary suspension and probation. In a written judgment released Friday, the court said a lesser punishment would fail to reinforce the higher standard to which lawyers and elected officials are held.
 
“By misappropriating the funds entrusted to her as a public officer and covering up that misappropriation with misrepresentations, respondent violated the public trust and abused her office,” the court wrote. “Such abuse of public office by an attorney ‘can suggest an inability to fulfill the professional role of lawyers.’ ”
 
Council, 60, of Omaha, can seek reinstatement as a lawyer in five years. The Supreme Court must consider such applications, although it rarely grants reinstatement.
 
Messages left with Council Friday morning were not immediately returned. Her lawyer, Vince Powers of Lincoln, said she was disappointed but accepted the court’s decision.
 
“Brenda Council very much regrets what happened,” Powers said. “She recognizes it’s 100 percent on her. It’s her responsibility. It’s no one else’s fault.”
 
Powers said Council is employed and is moving on with her life. He declined to say what she is doing professionally, but he emphasized she remains committed to treatment for her gambling addiction.
 
The case stems from Council’s misappropriation of more than $63,000 in campaign funds, which she spent at casinos over a 2½-year period. She used a campaign debit card to withdraw money more than 100 times. Her misuse of the funds came to light in 2012 when Attorney General Jon Bruning filed state charges.
 
Professional disciplinary charges were filed against Council’s license based on two misdemeanor convictions in state court for abuse of public records. She pleaded guilty and was fined $250 on each charge.
 
In October, felony wire fraud charges were filed in U.S. District Court. In a plea deal, she was fined $500 and put on probation for three years.
 
During a May hearing before the high court, John W. Steele, assistant counsel for discipline, said: “I don’t think we should have felons practice law.”
 
At the same hearing, Powers said the court should take into account his client’s long record of public service and professional accomplishment.
 
Fremont attorney Thomas Thomsen, the court referee, had recommended that her law license be suspended for one year and that she be given two years’ probation.
 
In his report, Thomsen praised Council’s record of service and her willingness to tackle her gambling addiction. She had since repaid the funds and had participated in a 12-step program to help overcome her addiction.
 
“We all lose if our sanction prevents (Council) from serving her clients in her community as an attorney,” Thomsen said.
 
Council also argued the misappropriation did not involve client funds.
 
But the high court said it did not see a distinction, because the money was used for a purpose other than for which it was intended. Additionally, the judges said the mitigating factors in Council’s case did not sufficiently overcome the fact that she committed the offense repeatedly and tried to cover it up.
 
Council was elected to north Omaha’s District 11 legislative seat in 2008, after serving on the Omaha school board and the Omaha City Council. She got her law degree from Creighton University in 1977.
 
Despite the charges, she sought a second term in the Legislature but was defeated.
 
Judge Lindsey Miller-Lerman recused herself from the case, which was decided by the court’s six other judges.
 
Contact the writer:
402-473-9587, joe.duggan@owh.com
Brenda Council
 
She regrets her actions and “recognizes it’s 100 percent on her,” says her lawyer, Vince Powers.

 
http://lexch.com/news/regional/she-used-campaign-donations-to-support-a-gambling-addiction/article_2650a41e-3ac9-11e4-bb8d-5f51796457e3.html


Friends of Brenda Council expect her to continue to help people, despite loss of her law license


State Sen. Brenda Council charged with campaign finance violations



[audio available on link]
 
Bruning also said he does not think the action will affect Council’s legal eligibility for office. The Nebraska Constitution says people convicted of felonies are ineligible for office, but contains no such provision for misdemeanors. Bruning noted that in 2005, Council had signed a voluntary ban on her presence at a casino in Council Bluffs, Iowa. When she later violated that ban, she was first warned, then was arrested for trespassing.

Council addressed that situation in a 2008 interview when it was raised by her opponent that year, Dennis Womack. “I think what people ought to focus on is that it was a decision on my part that that was an activity that I should discontinue. And the error that was committed was going into a facility, not for the purpose of gambling, and having the effect of my decision to discontinue that activity come back to haunt me,” she said at the time.
 

Thursday, September 11, 2014

REPEAL THE CASINO DEAL! Lawn signs... and a new website!








Good morning,


The primary election has come and gone. Now, all eyes turn toward the November election where we will be one of the most closely watched campaigns, both locally and from around the nation. We have the power to stop the casino mess here in Massachusetts and send a powerful message to the industry.


Casinos will continue to write blank checks, committing to spend big over the next seven weeks. The demand for Repeal the Casino Deal materials: lawn signs, literature, bumper stickers and lapel pins, has been overwhelming. Your generous support will allow us to share our message with the voters we need to hear it. Here's a breakdown of what your donation can buy:






This week, our supporters were out spreading the word at polling locations and neighborhoods around the Commonwealth, informing voters what's at stake this fall. Casinos have offered empty promises, that fail to pan out again and again, leaving behind empty buildings, wrecked neighborhoods, and taxpayer bailouts.


How else are we spreading the word? Through our new Yes on 3 website! Give it a look, and share it with your friends, family, and neighbors. It'll be an ongoing source for the latest news and facts about casino repeal.


Join the campaign to stop the casino mess. Please donate, volunteer to help, and follow us on social media. This fall, it's a Yes on Question 3.


Together, we'll defeat the casino industry.


John Ribeiro

Chairman

Repeal the Casino Deal




Repeal the Casino Deal | PO Box 520162 | Winthrop | MA | 02152

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Gambling Regulators In N.Y., Mass., Review Mohegan Plans On Same Day





Gambling Regulators In N.Y., Mass., Review Mohegan Plans On Same Day


New York is racing against neighboring Massachusetts to add resort casinos, and nobody was more aware of that Tuesday than Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority CEO Mitchell Grossinger Etess.

Etess gave a sweeping presentation of his company's plan for a Catskills casino shortly after 8 a.m.
Tuesday in Albany, N.Y. As soon as he was finished, he jumped on a private jet to fly to Boston where the Massachusetts Gaming Commission is sizing up competing proposals for a Mohegan Sun or a Wynn resort in Greater Boston.

"It's been a busy morning," Etess said just before noon, having just arrived in Boston.
The scramble from Albany to Boston demonstrates what the Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority is trying to achieve, he said.

"It really involves expanding our brand throughout the Northeast," Etess said.

As a result, his company had to figure out how to be in two places Tuesday morning. As a result, Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority Chairman Kevin Brown was in Boston while Etess and more than a half-dozen others were in Albany at the New York Gaming Commission meeting.

The Bay State's legislature in 2011 passed legislation allowing three resort casinos in different regions of the state and one slots parlor. The process has culminated in a final review this week. Massachusetts regulators could pick either Wynn or Mohegan Sun by week's end.

New York is working through a much faster process. Applications for casinos were due in April, and gambling regulators in the Empire State are already hearing presentations with the hope of selecting winners in "early fall."

In New York State, gambling regulators will allow four casinos in three regions of Upstate New York, apart from areas where the state now has Indian casinos. Mohegan Sun at The Concord is one of nine plans vying for a license in the Catskills-Hudson Valley region.

Asked if September is the busiest period he can remember, Etess said, "It has been a pretty hectic time."



http://www.courant.com/business/hc-mohegan-sun-new-york-massachusetts-20140909,0,4885407.story

Casinos aren't the answer




Casinos aren't the answer

By Froma Harrop : September 9, 2014
 
Protestors hold signs across the street from a meeting New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie convened on Monday on the future of Atlantic City, hours after Christie's administration said it will allow the casinos and horse tracks to offer sports betting. Photo: Associated Press / AP
Photo By Associated Press
Protestors hold signs across the street from a meeting New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie convened on Monday on the future of Atlantic City, hours after Christie's administration said it will allow the casinos and horse tracks to offer sports betting.
 
The video for the Bruce Springsteen song “Atlantic City” opens with a scene of the grand Marlborough-Blenheim Hotel imploding into a pile of dust. That was almost 40 years ago. The Traymore Hotel and other grand hotels were leveled in much the same spectacular fashion.

In their place rose glass boxes and concrete hulks to house new casinos. The Atlantic City dream was to fill New Jersey state coffers with gambling gold.

At the time, Nevada held a monopoly on casinos. The plan was to turn Atlantic City into a Las Vegas East drawing rollers — high and low — preferably from other tax jurisdictions.
But that dream went bad all around.

At least four Atlantic City casinos are closing this year, in part because of intense competition from newer gaming establishments in nearby Pennsylvania and elsewhere. Another problem for casinos nationally is the tough economy for their core market — blue-collar and middle-income workers.

Casino revenues in New Jersey are down 44 percent from their 2006 high, but the business is rough everywhere. The huge Harrah's in Tunica, Mississippi, has also shut its doors.

The casino business is now in the advanced “cannibalizing” stage as competitors eat what's left of each other's lunch. By “competitors,” we mean both the casinos and the states relying on their revenues.

Atlantic City's special tragedy is what was traded for the casino fantasy. Nowadays cities run entire visitor campaigns around the sort of fabulous old architecture Atlantic City so easily discarded.

Imagine what today's entrepreneurs could have done with a mythical beach resort smack in between New York and Washington!

Casino lust persists, but the argument has changed. Casinos are rarely portrayed as a font of tax revenues from out-of-state pockets. In most of the country, casino customers are increasingly locals who would have spent their spare dollars at local restaurants, theaters and other entertainment venues.

The new sales pitch for casinos rings more of desperation: If the state's working class is going to be milked by gaming conglomerates and the states that tax them, better that the milking take place at home than in a neighboring state.

Some states have valiantly managed to hold the line. Nebraska, for example, does not allow full-fledged casinos even though Iowa has placed three in Council Bluffs, right across the Missouri River from Omaha. (Iowa's gambling tax revenues are also falling.)

Massachusetts seems to be succumbing and is now involved in an odd negotiation with Mohegan Sun, an Indian casino operator applying to build an outlet near Boston. Mohegan Sun already has a big-league casino in eastern Connecticut, not far from the state border. Massachusetts wants a promise that it will not entice the state's high-stakes gamblers to its flagship in Connecticut (where casino taxes are lower). Mohegan Sun has yet to agree.

The statesmen running New Jersey now figure: If casinos aren't making it in South Jersey, perhaps the solution is casinos in North Jersey. How about putting them “somewhere in the swamps of Jersey” — a Springsteen reference to the Meadowlands?

The Meadowlands sit a mere 9 miles west of Manhattan, a casino-free zone. New York state, however, seems to have its own plans. It is now considering several industrial-strength casinos just north of New York City (and, for that matter, the New Jersey state line).

Jersey's casino boosters seem undeterred. A North Jersey state senator — mindful of South Jersey's fear of new competition — recently ventured that a couple of big casinos in his part of the state “could produce in excess of $1 billion over 10 years to be reinvested in Atlantic City.”
Sure. If you say so.

fharrop@gmail.com



http://www.mysanantonio.com/opinion/commentary/article/Casinos-aren-t-the-answer-5744342.php






Breaking today: Columbia School of Public Health publishes major story on impacts of casinos and lotteries






The Columbia School of Public Health published a major national story today about the massive public health impacts of government-sponsored casinos and lotteries. Investigated by Elaine Meyer, it spotlights how predatory gambling is harming millions of Americans and the communities they live in. You can read it here on the Columbia School of Public Health website (all of the buttons to share it are on the right side of its front page.)

For much of the last twenty-five years, most in the public health community in America have been willfully silent on this issue but thanks to the hard work and sacrifice of so many of you in our movement nationally, that has been changing. Today's story is evidence of our collective efforts.

Please read the story and then share it with all of your personal social networks along with anyone you know in the health care and public health fields. And make extra certain to share it with all the public health officials in your community, county and state.

Change happens when we each do our job in making it happen. Keep pushing.

Thanks for your work.

Best,

Les

____________

Les Bernal

National Director

Stop Predatory Gambling

"End the unfairness and inequality created by government-sponsorship of casinos and lotteries."

If you support our mission and work, please participate by contributing $10 or more today to help sustain it.


logo

Quick Links

An American Declaration on Government and Gambling

Online Store

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Take Action

A Failed Government Policy

Lies vs. Facts

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Donate To The Mission



Stop Predatory Gambling Foundation ι 100 Maryland Avenue NE, Room 310 ι Washington, D.C. 20002 ι (202) 567-6996

Flaws?


Mass. Gaming Commission sees flaws in casino plans. Are we surprised? Stop the Casino Mess. Vote Yes on Question 3.

Gambling Regulators to Select Boston-Area Casino

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

One man's story of addiction: ‘Gambling away my mental health with 80-100 bets a day’




One man's story of addiction: ‘Gambling away my mental health with 80-100 bets a day’




By Noel Baker
Senior Reporter


Today marks the start of Gamblers Anonymous Awareness week. Here, one man tells Noel Baker how a mountain of debt is slowly shrinking, years after he won the battle against his addiction.

MICHAEL knew something was seriously wrong when, one day some years ago, he found himself betting on the outcome of a beach volleyball game.

It wasn’t the first time he had placed peculiar wagers, in what had become a scatter-gun approach to gambling. What started at his local greyhound track in his early teens, had escalated to the stage where he was “addicted to Teletext”, constantly seeking updates on sporting events, ploughing cash into betting on sports in which he could most certainly not claim any expertise. “Mainly racing, Moto GP, soccer...”

An enthusiastic, sharp fellow, Michael [not his real name], ultimately ended up laying between 80 and 100 bets a day and in debt to the tune of tens of thousands of euro.

“The big thing for me was not the money,” he says. “It was gambling away my mental health.”

For years, he believed he had gambling under control and freely admits that at times he had “loads of money”. The situation changed dramatically when he began chasing his losses.

At the end of one year, he owed as much as €35,000. A year later, it was more than double that amount.

He lost his job and, by the sounds of it, he almost lost his reasoning.

But now, the debt has been whittled down to a fraction of what it was.

“Every month, the money goes out it is a reminder that you never want to get into that situation again.”

The situation had reached a crisis point and he visited a doctor, informing him: “Look, I’m in big trouble.” Lying to friends and family, chasing losses, issues at work — it had all taken a massive toll and “the penny dropped”.

“The first six months, I just stopped gambling but I wasn’t changing my ways,” he says.

Attending more meetings led to a more holistic approach to how he was living his life and conducting his relationships. “You have to keep going to your meetings because if you stop, it could become attractive again,” he says, adding that he attends meetings three or four times a week, mostly at lunchtime.

“The big thing was that I did not watch races,” he says. “You do not look up Teletext, you stop hanging around with other gamblers, you cannot buy a scratch-card.

“I was addicted to Teletext. When I came into GA, I came home and the only button I could see on the TV remote control was the Teletext button. It was like a beacon.

“I got a pen knife and cut it off.”

If that sounds drastic, he believes he had no choice.

Perhaps saying something about the scale of the problem — at least, how it is viewed by Gamblers Anonymous — Gambling Awareness Week actually lasts for two weeks. The growth in gambling here in recent years mirrors a trend from the UK. In addition to a greater number of shops, online betting is a modern-day phenomenon, creating jobs and pumping money into the economy. As far as Michael is concerned, the origins of the money is at the heart of the debate over gambling. He claims that bookmakers do not make massive profits on people “betting on the Grand National”. Rather, it is the compulsive gamblers that plough their money into the sector.

“There is a huge problem in society with gambling at the moment,” he says. Heavily involved in Gamblers Anonymous, he claims attendance at some GA meetings had “doubled, if not trebled” in the past year, with the age-profile getting younger — “there would be lads aged 18 or 19 coming into the room”.

A larger number of secondary schools have asked GA representatives to make presentations, as since the advent of smart- phones, a bet can be only a few clicks away. According to Michael, GA has also increased its number of visits to prisons around the country, often at the request of inmates. He believes it is possible that some people jailed for petty drugs offences may have taken to selling drugs to help pay for gambling debts.

Michael’s own life has steadied remarkably in recent years, but he believes it is a work in progress and without due focus and resilience, he would be at risk of relapse.

“Time is a healer,” he says. “I can laugh it all off now, but at the time it wasn’t very funny.”

The urge to gamble?

Gamblers Anonymous Awareness Week 2014, from today until September 14 will include open meetings where members from the public can attend and the list of these open meetings will be on the GA website: www.gamblersanonymous.ie

Here are some questions that compulsive gamblers often answer ‘Yes’ to:
- Do you lose time from work due to gambling?
- Is gambling affecting your reputation?
- After losing, do you feel you must return as soon as possible and win back your loses?
- After a win do you have a strong urge to return and try to win more?
- Do you often gamble until your last euro is gone?
- Do you gamble longer than you planned?


http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/one-mans-story-of-addiction-gambling-away-my-mental-health-with-80-100-bets-a-day-285354.html

Vote Today!



CHECK THE LIST BELOW FOR EACH CANDIDATES POSITION ON REPEAL THE CASINO DEAL!



 
Good morning,
Today is an important day. While we're just eight weeks away from the general election-when you'll be able to vote yes and stop the casino mess-today marks the day voters across the Commonwealth select their party's nominees.
While we do not advocate for or against any particular candidates, we do want to let you know where they stand on the issue of casino repeal, Question 3. The following chart shows the stated positions of candidates for statewide office.
This week, we're also expecting the announcement by the Gambling Commission of the Boston area (Region A) casino license. While the Commission hears final deliberations ahead of their decision, we have an important veto-your vote!
Repeal the Casino Deal is out every day in neighborhoods across Massachusetts, educating voters about the casino mess and how they can stop it this fall.
Join the campaign to stop the casino mess. Please donate, volunteer to help, and follow us on social media. This fall, it's a Yes on Question 3.
Together, we'll defeat the casino industry.
John Ribeiro
Chairman
Repeal the Casino Deal
 
 
 
 

Monday, September 8, 2014

Join your friends and neighbors!




Get the FACTS to protect ALL Massachusetts Communities!


Grassroots




COUNTDOWN
58 Days
to Election Day





Many people CAN win
over Big Money


Look how far we've come! We don't need to raise more than casinos to win - we just need people willing to make phone calls and go door-to-door! But we do need some money for cards, flyers, phone lines, advertising, signs and bumper stickers ... so consider a small donation - thousands of small donations and your hard work will get us over the finish line!

Just $25 will help:




$25 from 1,000 volunteers = $25,000





SEND SELFIES

as you canvass or make calls - let's show our strength



YES on 3
Repeal the Casino Deal




CAMPAIGN
OFFICES





EAST BOSTON
59 Meridian Street
2nd Floor
Boston MA
T Accessible





SPRINGFIELD



130 Maple Street
Suite 241
Springfield MA

MAIN
CONTACTS
Field Director
Brain Ashmankas
repealfielddirector@gmail.com
Call/Text 774-276-1281

Western Massachusetts
Al Cabot
WMassVYO3@gmail.com Call/Text 413-438-4963


See below for our schedule of events this week. .


If these events or locations don't fit your schedule, you can still help! Please contact Brian Ashmankas or Al Cabot to set up a phone bank or canvass in your neighborhood.



T H I S C O M I N G W E E K

EASTERN MA


Tuesday, September 9th / 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
Hold signs and distribute flyers at the polls
Your local polling location
Wednesday, September 10th / 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
East Boston Phone Bank at campaign office, 59 Meridian Street in East Boston
Anytime


Make calls to voters in Sherborn.
Contact Gerri Hawn at gmhawn@gmail.com and she'll send you a list (just be sure to return it when it is completed)
Thursday, September 11th / 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
East Boston Phone Bank at campaign office,
59 Meridian Street in East Boston
Saturday, September 13th / 9:30 am - 12 noon
Winthrop canvass, meet at campaign office, 59 Meridian Street in East Boston
Sunday, September 14th / 12:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Winthrop canvass, meet at campaign office,
59 Meridian Street in East Boston



NORTH OF BOSTON
Tuesday, September 9th / 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
Hold signs and distribute flyers at the polls
Your local polling location
Wednesday, September 10th / 6:00pm - 8:30pm
Merrimack Valley Phone Bank
60 Island St, 4th floor, Lawrence (Headquarters of Stop Predatory Gambling)
Thursday, September 11th / 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Beverly Phone Bank, 7 Beckford St., Beverly
Anytime
Lexington Canvass, pick up walk lists and fliers at Joel's house, 12 Shirley St., Lexington. Call 704-723-1002 to arrange a pick up time.
SOUTH OF BOSTON
Tuesday, September 9th / 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
Hold signs and distribute flyers at the polls
Your local polling location

Anytime
Brockton Canvass, pick up walk lists and fliers from Michelle Littlefield. Call or text Michelle at 508-328-9285 to arrange a pick up time.
Anytime
Bridgewater Phone Bank, pick up call lists from Michelle Littlefield. Call or text Michelle at 508-328-9285 to arrange a pick up time.

CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS
Tuesday, September 9th / 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
Hold signs and distribute flyers at the polls
Your local polling location
Sunday, September 14th / 5:00 pm - 7:30pm
Grafton canvass, meet at the Grafton Stop & Shop,
100 Worcester St. in the parking lot near the entrance.
Sunday, September 14th / 5:00 pm - 7:30pm
Southbridge canvass, meet at 176 Main St.,
Southbridge in parking lot
Anytime
Canvass or Phone Bank in your town (or someone else's). E-mail Brian Ashmankas at RepealFieldDirector@gmail.com and he'll send you a calling or walking list.

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS
Tuesday, September 9th / 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
Hold signs and distribute flyers at the polls
Your local polling location
Wednesday, September 10th / 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Phone bank and canvass, meet at Springfield campaign office, 130 Maple St., suite 241
Thursday, September 11th / 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Phone bank and canvass, meet at Springfield campaign office, 130 Maple St., suite 241
Saturday, September 13th / 9:30 am - 12:00pm
Phone bank and canvass, meet at Springfield campaign office, 130 Maple St., suite 241
Sunday, September 14th / 5:00pm - 7:30pm
Phone bank and canvass, meet at Springfield campaign office, 130 Maple St., suite 241
Anytime
Canvass or Phone Bank in your town (or someone else's). E-mail Al Cabot at WMassVYO3@gmail.com and he'll send you a calling or walking list

Thank you for your help. Without volunteers like you, our grassroots campaign would not exist.



RSVP - SELECT ONE OF THREE WAYS

  1. Reply to this e-mail
  2. Call, text or email Brian Ashmankas:
    repealfielddirector@gmail.com or 774-276-1281
  3. or for Western Massachusetts, Al Cabot: WMassVYO3@gmail.com or 413-438-4963663

Brian Ashmankas
Field Director

Repeal the Casino Deal | repealfielddirector@gmail.com
59 Meridian Street 2nd Floor, East Boston, MA 02128


(617) 569 2599 | www.repealthecasinodeal.org