Meetings & Information

Invitation to National Conference on Govt-Sponsored Casinos and Lotteries

Message from Les Bernal
National Director,
Stop Predatory Gambling :
I'm writing to encourage you to attend an important national conference on government-sponsored gambling being held this summer titled "Gambling Addiction and Society: Thinking Anew."


Massachusetts Gam[bl]ing Commission

Check the Gambling Commission site for changes and updates:
http://www.mass.gov/gaming/


You may submit your comments to the commission at: mgccomments@state.ma.us




Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Connecticut’s casino boom going bust


Let's not replicate the mistakes of others!

REPEAL THE CASINO DEAL!

If you haven't already read Robert Steele's book, it's a MUST READ!








Connecticut’s casino boom going bust


Bay State should be wary of hopping on gambling bandwagon


Monday, July 21, 2014

Lesson of the nonexistent 'hot machine' still rings true



Lesson of the nonexistent 'hot machine' still rings true

By Mark Gruetze Administrative Editor


Published: Sunday, July 20, 2014


The young woman working the entrance of the Downtown Las Vegas slots parlor beckoned earnestly.
My wife and I, on one of our early trips to Sin City, were there with a coupon for a free souvenir, but the woman said we could do better. She had noticed a particularly hot machine and guided us to it. After her tales of big payouts, which her supervisor backed up, we bought silver dollars and played them through. Nothing. So much for that vow of riches.
We learned a valuable lesson those many years ago, back when slot players had to pull the handle and machines didn't accept bills: You shouldn't believe everything you hear in a casino.
That maxim came to mind recently when the state accused a former roulette dealer at Meadows Casino in Washington County of conspiracy and other offenses. Court documents say an agent with the Gaming Unit of the Attorney General's Office and a member of the State Police Gaming Enforcement Office at the Meadows got a tip from a confidential informant that Robert “Rudy” Valle, 56, of Wintersville, Ohio, was telling customers he could help them win at roulette. Court documents give this account:
Valle told a player he knew how to guide the roulette ball toward a section of the wheel, and gamblers could win by betting on one of the numbers in that section. The player turned out to be a confidential informant who has provided state and local police with information that led to the arrests of about 50 people. Valle's “specific detailed description” of the scheme included instructions to bet on 4 plus its roulette wheel neighbors, 16, 23, 33, 35, 14 and 21, to increase the chances of winning.
Defense attorney Christopher Blackwell says Valle was just being friendly and explaining roulette to a novice. Steering the roulette ball to a specific section of the wheel is “absolutely impossible” because of variables such as humidity in the air, a rule that dealers cannot look at the wheel when spinning the ball and the use of balls that differ in size and weight, Blackwell says.
The state does not allege that Valle did anything more than talk about the numbers.
A roulette wheel is built to deter cheating. It has 38 numbered slots — one to 36, zero and double zero — that follow a pattern of two even numbers and two odd numbers, with red and black squares alternating. The green zero and double zero are opposite each other on the wheel; so are consecutive numbers, such as 1 and 2.
While the numbered wheel rotates one direction, the dealer spins the hard plastic ball in the opposite direction. Pennsylvania says the ball must make at least four trips around the wheel, but in practice it's usually more. After the ball falls from the ledge, it bounces around numerous decorative “canoes” before landing in a numbered slot — sometimes jumping out of other slots.
Valle's instructions cover seven of the 38 possible results on the wheel. So, over the long run, the ball would land in one of those numbers once in about every five spins no matter what.
The idea of dealers being able to steer a roulette ball is an enduring myth along the lines of belief that a blackjack dealer will fail to bust unless someone at the table takes a hit, that a craps dealer will lose on the roll after a die goes off the table or that a lucky dance will make a slot machine pay off.
Some scientists say chaos theory can give roulette players an edge, although that involves calculating the speed of the ball, then using a formula to determine which half of the wheel the ball is likely to fall into and spreading the bets before the dealer closes the action.
With any beat-the-house gimmick, I ask myself: Why would a lovely young woman point out the hot slot machine to two fresh-faced young tourists instead of saving it for herself or her friends?
Then, I remember why you shouldn't believe everything you hear in a casino.
Mark Gruetze is administrative editor for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7838 or players@tribweb.com.
Money trail
Table-game players lost $57.8 million in Pennsylvania casinos during June, the Gaming Control Board says. While that was down from June 2013, casinos' table-game win for the fiscal year ending June 30 was up 2.63 percent from 2012-13.
Table-game revenue for the year was $731.9 million. Combined with $2.3 billion in slot revenue, the casinos' win for the year was $3.05 billion, down 2.87 percent from the 2012-13 total of $3.1 billion. It was first year-over-year decline in total gambling revenue in the eight years the state has had legal gambling. Pennsylvania still ranks No. 2 in gambling revenue, behind Nevada and ahead of New Jersey.


Table game revenue in 2013-14 for Western Pennsylvania casinos:
Rivers: $68.43 million, down 1.23 percent from $69.28 million in 2012-13
Meadows: $29.96 million, down 16.75 percent from $35.98 million
Presque Isle: $12.46 million, down 16.68 percent from $14.96 million
Lady Luck Nemacolin: $4.83 million; open only for two test nights in 2012-13
Source: Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board
3 FROM AREA CASH IN AT MAIN EVENT
Jack Schanbacher of Reserve placed 131st in the Main Event at the World Series of Poker. The $52,141 payout was his fourth cash of this year's WSOP, giving him a total of $61,086 in the seven-week event. The $10,000-per-seat No Limit Hold 'Em tournament had 6,683 entrants. the fifth largest field in its 45-year history. Two other Western Pennsylvania players finished in the money at the Main Event:
• David Tannenholz of Pittsburgh, $22,678 for placing 530th
• Richard Tatalovich of Pittsburgh, $20,228 for placing 617th


http://triblive.com/mobile/6449036-96/ball-roulette-wheel


The Costs exceed the Revenues!




Another Disingenuous Study of CRIME!


Step up patrols in the immediate area, focus only on 4 categories of CRIME and VOILA!

Another phony study of CRIME!

Don't buy it!
Massachusetts ‘GAMING’ Future
The real crime here that no one's talking about is that 95% of casino patrons are losing theirs and many times others money's on a daily basis.
Philadelphia Inquirer - July 19, 2014 - Study says crime has not risen around SugarHouse Casino
A study by two Philadelphia researchers has found that crime in the immediate area of SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia's Fishtown section has not increased since the casino opened 2010.
The study, by Lallen T. Johnson, assistant professor of criminal justice at Drexel University, and Jerry H. Ratcliffe, chair of Temple University's department of criminal justice, says crime rates in Fishtown were largely unaffected by the arrival of SugarHouse in the 1000 block of North Delaware Avenue in September 2010.





Study says crime has not risen around SugarHouse Casino



Increased police presence was cited by a researcher as a possible reason crime did not rise after SugarHouse opened in 2010. TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Increased police presence was cited by a researcher as a possible reason crime did not rise after SugarHouse opened in 2010. TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer





POSTED: July 20, 2014
 
 
 
 
A study by two Philadelphia researchers has found that crime in the immediate area of SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia's Fishtown section has not increased since the casino opened 2010.
The study, by Lallen T. Johnson, assistant professor of criminal justice at Drexel University, and Jerry H. Ratcliffe, chair of Temple University's department of criminal justice, says crime rates in Fishtown were largely unaffected by the arrival of SugarHouse in the 1000 block of North Delaware Avenue in September 2010.
Before the casino's opening, area residents and civic groups said they worried that the influx of gamblers would draw criminals, too.
The research, which used no external funding, started in 2012 and looked at Philadelphia police crime data from 2004 through 2011, Johnson said.
The study, "A Partial Test of the Impact of a Casino on Neighborhood Crime" was published online by Palgrave MacMillan's Security Journal, a journal for security researchers and professionals. The article, which underwent a peer review, is also to be published in an upcoming print issue of the journal.
Johnson said the study, focused on four kinds of crime: violent street felonies; vehicle crimes, such as auto theft and break-ins; burglaries; and drug crimes.
"We found no statistically significant effect," Johnson said.
Jethro Heiko, one of the founders of the anti-casino group Casino Free Philadelphia, who lives about a block from SugarHouse, said he was not surprised.
He said Philadelphia and State Police had stepped up patrols after the casino opened.
"The issues of crime, as I see them with casinos, is they are not the violent local neighborhood crime issues. . . . It's more of the white-collar crime, embezzlement and fraud," Heiko said.
He said a study should focus on how people with gambling addiction may steal from employers.
Paul Boni, a lawyer who represented Casino Free Philadelphia, agreed, urging a focus on crimes related to gambling addiction, such as embezzlement. He also said he thought the study was "too limited, both in geography and types of crime."
Johnson agreed that an increased police presence might have kept a lid on crime in the area.
He noted that Philadelphia police had created a special patrol district in an area around the casino.
Johnson said there was some evidence of "displacement" in vehicle crime, as shown by a rise of such offenses in areas near Fishtown.
He said it was the sheer increase in the number of people arriving at the casino area may have deterred some crime.

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Mashpee Wampanoag Propaganda




Wampanoag chief has mixed feelings on casino bid



MASHPEE, Mass. (AP) — In the centuries since its ancestors greeted the Pilgrims in 1620, the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe has struggled to overcome financial hardship, recover lost land and even reclaim its nearly forgotten language.



The tribe's 92-year-old traditional chief, Vernon "Silent Drum" Lopez, says much has changed since the days of his youth when members mostly lived off the land. He supports the tribal council's bid for a $500 million casino in Taunton, but acknowledges some mixed emotions.

He says there are pros and cons to casinos and worries about the potential for debt or corruption.




Council chairman Cedric Cromwell says a casino would be an economic boost for the tribe, which recently opened a new headquarters in Mashpee and operates an oyster farm at nearby Popponesset Bay.



http://www.businessweek.com/ap/2014-07-20/wampanoag-chief-has-mixed-feelings-on-casino-bid

Donald Trump: “I got out seven years ago. My timing was tremendous”









By Joan Vennochi | GLOBE COLUMNIST JULY 20, 2014

THOUSANDS OF jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars in tax revenues would fall like manna from gambling heaven. For two decades, that’s been the big talking point behind the push to bring casinos to Massachusetts.
 
Hyperbole was always part of the pitch. But today, the rosiest projections seem ever more fanciful. Just as Massachusetts starts to bank on the money, the glitter is wearing off the industry. No matter how glitzy the drawings for the next gambling mecca, the business itself looks old, tired, and battered by competition — not just from new online gambling options but from other old-school casinos.
The industry slide leaves Massachusetts behind the curve, instead of ahead of it.
Four of 12 casinos are shutting down in Atlantic City, and casinos in Delaware and West Virginia are struggling. In Connecticut, Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun just reported double-digit declines in slots revenues. Even Reno now prefers to pitch itself as a destination for high-tech companies rather than a remote Nevada haven for gamblers and quickie-divorce seekers.
There is dramatic oversupply in the industry right now,” Foxwoods chief executive Scott Butera told The Wall Street Journal. That’s especially true in the Northeast, where more casinos have opened over the past decade than in any other region, the Journal reports. The market is “reaching a saturation point,” according to a recent Fitch Ratings report that was also cited by the Journal.
With three casinos and a slots parlor in the pipeline — plus a bid by the Aquinnah Wampanoag tribe to run a fourth casino in the state — Massachusetts will only add to a saturated market. But the shifting fortunes of the gambling industry have yet to infiltrate the political dialogue or dull the appetite of casino operators. Indeed, despite Butera’s somber take on his own industry, Foxwoods was still vying to build a casino in Massachusetts, in the town of Milford, until voters rejected its bid in November.
The state is already relying on gambling revenue, even though a ballot question this November will present voters with the chance to repeal the 2011 casino law. The budget just signed by Governor Deval Patrick includes $73 million in anticipated revenue from casino licensing fees and the slots parlor.
David D’Alessandro, the former John Hancock chief executive and longtime gambling foe who is helping to fund the repeal effort, said the gambling market in Massachusetts is already saturated before a casino even opens. “We’re going to be stealing from our own lottery,” he said, referring to the 42-year-old state lottery, which leads the nation in per capita wagering.
According to its website, the state lottery returned over $955.8 million in net profit to the state in fiscal 2013. Of that, $868.9 million in local aid was distributed to the Commonwealth’s 351 cities and towns. A succession of casino impact reports over the years predicted some money would be siphoned off from the lottery, but advocates have always insisted the state could somehow make it up.
Why would Massachusetts want to give up 100 percent of lottery-generated revenue for 25 percent of gross casino-generated revenue? “We’re smarter than that,” said D’Alessandro.
Or at least we should be.
Still, the Massachusetts Gaming Commission website continues to predict $300 million to $500 million in annual new revenue. The website prominently displays news about the gambling debate in the Commonwealth — but omits any headlines about the industry’s souring prospects nationally.
Despite growing evidence to the contrary, Massachusetts still thinks of casinos as a growth industry. Maybe they were 20 years ago. But today, starting up the casino industry in Massachusetts feels like starting up Wang Laboratories in the age of Google.
Massachusetts prides itself on adaptation — on its ability to foster new tech startups in areas where clipper ships once delivered riches from overseas. Yet with casinos, it’s buying into an industry as old as time and riskier than ever before.
As Atlantic City struggles to reinvent itself, it can only dream of having an economy as diverse and thriving as Boston’s. As Atlantic City’s Trump Plaza Casino prepares to close in mid-September, Donald Trump crowed that he only has a 10 percent stake in Trump Entertainment Resorts, which owns it. “I got out seven years ago. My timing was tremendous,” said Trump.
Too bad Massachusetts, which is just now getting into casinos, can’t say the same.
Joan Vennochi can be reached at vennochi@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @Joan_Vennochi.

 

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Foxwoods, Mohegan Sun Tumbling! No End In sight!


The Gambling Market is SATURATED....REVENUES ARE DECLINING....the local supply of Gambling Addicts has been exhausted..... 
 
 
 
The sensible solution is REPEAL THE CASINO DEAL!

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut’s two American Indian casinos on Tuesday again reported monthly drops in slot machine betting and revenue.

Mohegan Sun said total slot machine bets in June totaled $574.9 million, down 10 percent from June 2013. Foxwoods Resort Casino reported total wagering of $479.1 million in June, down 5 percent from the same month last year.

Mohegan Sun said the share of wagers known as revenue was $45.3 million, down 10 percent from June 2013. Foxwoods reported revenue of $37.7 million, a 13 percent drop.

With only some exceptions, wagering and revenue have been falling steadily at the two casinos, which face increasing competition and flagging consumer demand in the weak economic recovery.

Robert J. Soper, president and chief executive officer of Mohegan Sun, said the numbers reflect “continued softness not only in this market but in most mature gaming markets throughout the industry.”
Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun are looking to expand into Massachusetts to drive up revenue.

Mohegan Sun also is “clearly focused on profitability” at its Connecticut site, Soper said. And the casino will continue to focus on entertainment, which he said has been very successful.

Though wagering dropped nearly one-third since a peak of $10.6 billion in the 2006-07 state fiscal year, Mohegan Sun is “cautiously optimistic that it’s close to stabilizing,” Soper said.
 

RTCD goes to Springfield





THE DECK IS STACKED AGAINST THE COMMONWEALTH
Good morning and happy Friday!

As you may have seen, we kicked off our casino repeal Western Massachusetts campaign in Springfield this week with a productive and invigorating mix of grassroots organizing and media meetings and interviews.

The Springfield event was our first official organizing meeting since securing a spot on the ballot with our historic Supreme Judicial Court victory just three weeks ago.

We chose Springfield for our kickoff knowing that though it is a key city for our campaign. Springfield is a struggling gateway community that is the hub of the region. And it is the epicenter of this battle because Springfield can do better than casinos – we know that, the people of Western Massachusetts know that.

Click on the links below to see some of the media we earned in Western Massachusetts this week and make sure to share with your friends and family.

The Republican: Activists Lay Out Their Case for Repealing Casino Law

WAMC: Anti-casino Activists Launch Referendum Campaign

CBS 3’s One-on-One interview with John Ribeiro

WGGB: Anti-Casino Group Launches Campaign to Support Ballot Question

We want better than casinos for communities like Springfield and we’re in this together, as a statewide group, to ensure we don’t turn Springfield into Detroit or Worcester into Atlantic City. Casinos are losing jobs, losing revenue and investors now see the industry’s outlook as “negative.” Let’s not double down on a bad idea.

We need every bit of support we can to get this campaign off the ground. We’ll be outspent by the casinos but we need your help to compete – and we’ll do it neighbor-to-neighbor, house-to-house, community-to-community.

This is Davis v. Goliath, the people v. money. And the people win.

Please help our cause and join our grassroots effort. To sign up as a volunteer in your community, please contact your local leaders or visit our repeal website.

To make a donation and support our grassroots efforts please donate here.

Thank you kindly for your support and, remember, Vote Yes to Stop the Casino Mess.


John Ribeiro

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Repeal the Casino Deal • P.O. Box 520162 • Winthrop, MA 02152

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Revenue continues tumble at Conn. casinos



Revenue continues tumble at Conn. casinos


Posted: Tuesday, July 15, 2014 12:37 pm


Associated Press
HARTFORD, Conn. — Connecticut's two Indian casinos have again reported monthly drops in slot machine betting and revenue.
The Mohegan Sun said Tuesday that total slot machine bets in June totaled $574.9 million, down 10 percent from June 2013. Foxwoods Resort Casino reported total wagering of $479.1 million in June, down 5 percent from the same month last year.
The Mohegan Sun said the share of wagers known as revenue was $45.3 million, down 10 percent from June 2013. Foxwoods reported revenue of $37.7 million, a 13 percent drop.
With only some exceptions, wagering and revenue have been falling steadily at the two casinos, which face increasing competition and flagging consumer demand in the weak economic recovery.