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Thursday, June 30, 2016

Genting New York Reveals $400-Million Aqueduct Racetrack Expansion




Genting New York Reveals $400-Million Aqueduct Racetrack Expansion

TOUGH TIMES TO PERSIST IN MACAU, MOODY’S WARNS




TOUGH TIMES TO PERSIST IN MACAU, MOODY’S WARNS


Macau’s struggling gaming market may have bottomed out after posting almost two years of continuous declines in monthly gambling revenues but credit-debt watcher Moody’s Investors Service warns that tough times to persist over the next three years.
Tough times to persist in Macau, Moody’s warns











The gambling-driven economy of Macau will see a 6 percent contraction year-on-year in 2016 amid falling gaming revenue, according to Moodys. It added that the rate of decline will be carried over in 2017 – albeit at a slower pace of 2.5 percent.
Moody’s also suggests that Macau will see a considerable deceleration from the robust 13.7% annual average GDP growth rate achieved during 2011-2015 period.
“We expect that growth will continue to contract over our rating horizon of the next two to three years, although the pace of decline should slow,” said Moody’s in its annual credit analysis of Macau.
In May, Moody’s stripped off Macau’s Aa3 debt rating with a “negative” outlook due to the uncertainty surrounding Chinese special autonomous region’s growth. Official data shows that Macau’s gross domestic product (GDP) contracted by 13.3 percent year-on-year in real terms in the first quarter of 2016.
The accumulated casino GGR of Macau in the first five months plunged by 11.9 percent to MOP91.91 billion ($11.5 billion) from the prior-year period, according to the official data of the Gaming Inspection and Coordination Bureau. Casino revenue nosedived by 9.6 percent year-on-year in May, marking 24 consecutive months of declines when measured in year-on-year terms.
“The economic shock to the gaming sector stemming from a decline in tourist arrivals from mainland China has resulted in a sharp drop in the [Macau] SAR’s headline GDP,” Moody’s explained. “Our forecasts of a slowdown in China could weigh on tourist inflows and spending in the near term. This situation, coupled with a maturing gaming industry and the ongoing anti-graft campaign will leave gaming revenues under pressure.”
Despite seeing negative growth rates, Moody’s noted that Macau’s fiscal position – driven by revenues from the gaming sector amid limited cutbacks to expenditure – remains strong and will continue to post surpluses until 2017
The Macau government surplus dropped by 35.8 percent year-on-year in the first five months of 2016 to MOP16.36 billion, official data showed.
“Macau’s fiscal reserve buffer is ample, despite surpluses having dwindled considerably over the last two years. The absence of public debt allowed the SAR to accumulate total reserves amounting to MOP345.1 billion (US$43.2 billion) or 94 percent of GDP at end-2015,” the credit debt watcher said. “Our expectation of a decrease in gaming revenues in 2016 and 2017 suggests that Macao’s economic, fiscal and external metrics will likely weaken considerably from prior robust trends.”

http://calvinayre.com/2016/06/30/casino/tough-times-to-persist-in-macau-moodys-warns/






Court says Suffolk Downs slots parlor question properly certified for 2016 ballot





SJC clears slots parlor question for November ballot

A 'yes' vote could give Plainridge competition
Posted: Tuesday, June 28, 2016 7:02 pm | Updated: 2:06 pm, Wed Jun 29, 2016.
PLAINVILLE - Voters will get to decide if Plainridge Park Casino will have competition from another slots parlor after a decision by the state Supreme Judicial Court.
The court ruled that an attempt to pass a refendum question allowing for a second slots parlor can go forward to the November election.
The unanimous decision stated that petitioners had met the requirements for getting the question on the ballot. It did not address the merits of the proposed slots parlor, itself.
A reclusive businessman named Eugene McCain is behind the effort, although he has said little about it.
His question asks voters to approve a second slots parlor to be located within 1,500 feet of a horse track.
The harness track at Plainridge already has slot machines. The only other track is Suffolk Downs in Boston, but it has closed down for all but six days a year.
The ballot question would amend a 2011 state law that allows for three resort casinos and one slot parlor in Massachusetts.


Court says Suffolk Downs slots parlor question properly certified for 2016 ballot



By Michael P. Norton / STATE HOUSE NEW SERVICE

Posted Jun. 28, 2016 at 3:02 PM 


A ballot question authorizing a slots parlor with up to 1,250 machines at the former Suffolk Downs horse racing track was properly certified for this November's ballot, according to the Supreme Judicial Court, which on Tuesday rejected the claims of plaintiffs who sought to have the question disqualified.
Ruling in Bogertman v. Attorney General, the high court rejected the assertions of 10 Suffolk County residents, including gambling opponents, that the initiative petition should be ruled ineligible for the ballot under the constitution's "local matters exclusion."
The court concluded that the slots parlor license proposed in the ballot question "could potentially be awarded to a site in many localities, even if it were most likely that it would be awarded to a site near Suffolk Downs," which is on the East Boston-Revere border.
The local matter exclusion is designed to ensure that only matters of statewide concern are put before voters statewide. The court noted that the petition's subject matter - gaming - is regulated by the state and "is plainly an issue of Statewide concern," with the facility's patrons and workers expected to come from outside the area, taxes flowing to the state, and its adverse consequences expected to spill over across municipal borders.
"These factors support submission of the petition to the entire Massachusetts electorate," the court concluded in an opinion written by Chief Justice Ralph Gants.
If approved, the question could lead to a second slots parlor.
After securing a slots license, Plainridge Park Casino in Plainville was the first expanded gambling facility to open under a 2011 law that authorized a single slot parlor and three resort casinos. The Massachusetts Gaming Commission has issued licenses for casinos to be located in Everett and Springfield. The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe is forging ahead with plans to build a tribal casino in Taunton.
The court also rejected the claim that the question should not have been certified because it is "substantially the same" as a matter that appeared on the ballot in either of the two preceding biennial state elections. The plaintiffs argued Question 3 in 2014, which called for a ban on casinos and slot parlors, was substantially the same as the proposed 2016 ballot question. Voters rejected the 2014 question.
Contrasting the casino ban question and this year's ballot question, Gants wrote that the pending proposal "merely seeks to make one incremental change in the licensing scheme for slots parlors by authorizing the commission to award a second license."
Attorney Matthew Cameron represented the plaintiffs and Jeffrey King and Hayley Trahan-Liptak submitted a brief on behalf of Eugene McCain, a Revere resident who is pushing the ballot question.
McCain is the chairman of the Horse Racing Jobs and Education Committee, a ballot committee that lists its mailing address as K&L Gates, a global law firm with a Boston office at State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street in Boston.

In a May 1 campaign finance report, the committee listed $284,000 in receipts and an equal amount in expenditures. The receipts all came from Capital Productions LLC based in Wilmington, Delaware. All of the expenditures were for signature gathering and the payments were made to J.E.F. Associates of West Springfield.
McCain filed the carefully worded initiative petition authorizing, but not requiring, the gaming commission to award one additional category 2 slots parlor license for a location that "shall be at least 4 acres large, and shall be adjacent to, and within 1500 feet of, a race track, including the track, grounds, paddocks, barns, auditorium, amphitheatre and/or bleachers, if any, where a horse racing meeting may physically be held, which race track shall have hosted a horse racing meeting, provided that said location is not separated from said race track by a highway railway."
The court wrote that the requirements "do not refer to any particular geographical location, and the plaintiffs have not demonstrated why a developer could not create a new entertainment complex that meets these specifications at any one of many possible locations across the Commonwealth where horse races have been held or could be conducted, and then proceed to apply for the new slots parlor license."
In their opinion, the court notes that counsel for the question's proponents had asserted in a memo that the siting criteria in the question would apply to at least 10 municipalities in Massachusetts that have already hosted horse racing meetings.
While the plaintiffs alleged that McCain has a "property interest" in the land near Suffolk Downs where the slots facility could be built, the court ruled those assertions "are not appropriate for judicial notice, and, even if they were, they would not suffice to show that the proposed law is limited to local matters."
King, who represents McCain, was unable to say Tuesday whether the ballot campaign had gathered sufficient signatures needed to clear an early July hurdle to secure ballot access in November. The committee by next Wednesday must submit at least 10,792 locally certified voter signatures to stay on track for the ballot. A spokesman for Secretary of State William Galvin told the News Service Tuesday that the campaign had so far turned in "some" of its signatures.
Saying it is focused on laws, not motives, the court acknowledged the interests that drive proponents and opponents of ballot questions "may often involve self-interest rather than the public interest," adding that "it may well be true that this petition was motivated by one person's desire to profit from the Commonwealth's developing gaming industry, based on his ownership interest in a particular property."

In court briefs, McCain's attorneys wrote that he "understands that an additional successful slot parlor and commercial development could help invigorate a neighboring race track and the local economy, providing jobs at race tracks and horse breeding farms across the state, providing tax resources for education and other community services, while generally bringing in additional economic revenue to the Commonwealth." His attorneys said McCain has "investigated and pursued the acquisition of properties throughout Massachusetts, including Revere" with the hope of meeting the conditions necessary to qualify for the slots license authorized by the ballot question.
In addition to Suffolk Downs, Plainridge Racecourse and the Brockton Fairgrounds, horse racing meetings have been held over the years in Massachusetts at Berkshire Downs in Hancock, Foxboro Raceway, the Franklin Fair, the Great Barrington Fair, the Marshfield Fair, the Northampton Fair, the Weymouth Fair, and the Middleborough Agricultural Fair, according to a court brief filed by McCain's attorneys. The site of the Franklin Fair is now a shopping plaza and there's a housing development at the location of the Weymouth Fair.


http://reading.wickedlocal.com/news/20160628/court-says-suffolk-downs-slots-parlor-question-properly-certified-for-2016-ballot

Supreme Court won’t hear Tribe’s case






Supreme Court won’t hear Tribe’s case


By Susan Field

Matthew L.M. Fletcher isn’t surprised that the United States Supreme Court has declined to hear a case involving dispute between Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe and the National Labor Relations Board.
Following the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, there was a significant chance of a 4-4 tie, according to Fletcher, a professor of law and director of the Indigenous Law and Policy Center at Michigan State University.
Saginaw Chippewa tribal officials have battled the NLRB for years over employee efforts to unionize – allowed under federal law but banned by the Tribe, and Tribal officials had asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a decision at the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in which judges ruled that casinos in Michigan run by Native tribes can’t stop employees from petitioning others in the workplace to form unions.
Fletcher, who has closely followed the case, said the Tribe will likely start to negotiate with labor organizations and the NLRB going into the future.

He also said it’s possible the Tribe could exercise the treaty right it claims to exclude and have a “showdown” with the NLRB.
However, Fletcher said he is highly doubtful that the price of exercising that treaty right, which might mean shutting down the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort for a time, would be worth the fight.
Supreme Court justices on Monday declined to “wade into the legal battle putting Native American tribal sovereignty against the federal government’s power to regulate labor relations in cases involving casinos on Indian land in Michigan,” according to the news agency Reuters.
Rulings by the appeals court gave the NLRB authority over casinos on Indian land.
Now that the Supreme Court has declined to take up the issue, Reuters reported, the Republican-led Congress stands as the tribes’ best hope of avoiding NLRB jurisdiction.
The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill in November to strip the NLRB’s authority over tribal business on Indian lands, but that has stalled in the Senate, according to Reuters.
That means tribes must abide by the two decisions from the Cincinnati-based federal Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, Reuters reported.
Last year, that court ruled that the NLRB could order the Soaring Eagle to reinstate a housekeeper who was fired for soliciting union support.
That employee, Susan Lewis, is thrilled for her former co-workers.
Lewis, who got work at an Alma manufacturing business shortly after being fired from the casino, was never re-hired and said she would not return to the job now because the work environment would be hostile.
“But if I did, I’d do the same thing all over again,” Lewis said.
Three California Native American associations filed official support for the Tribe in its fight against the NLRB earlier this year.
Tribal public relations officials did not respond to a request for comment.



Judge narrows focus of suit brought by casino foes






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MASHPEE WAMPANOAG

Judge narrows focus of suit brought by casino foes

Interior Department's land trust decision now key issue

Posted Jun. 29, 2016 at 7:09 PM 

BOSTON — Arguments over dismissing parts of the federal lawsuit brought by East Taunton neighbors against the U.S. Department of the Interior are on hold and, instead, a federal judge will narrow his focus to one key issue that paved the way for a Mashpee Wampanoag casino.
On July 11, U.S. District Court Judge William G. Young will consider dueling summary judgment motions having to do with how the tribe’s land application was approved given a 2009 U.S. Supreme Court ruling, known as the Carcieri decision. In that ruling, the nation’s highest court called into question the Interior Department's ability to take land in trust for tribes recognized after 1934, the year of the Indian Reorganization Act.
The Mashpee tribe was federally recognized in 2007.
The court approved the stipulation before yesterday’s motion hearing in Boston, so the session was put on hold, said David Tennant, an attorney for the East Taunton plaintiffs.
“We’re dealing with the Carcieri issue as a standalone,” he said. “Everything else is in hibernation.”
Earlier this month, Young decided not to hear arguments for an injunction sought by the neighbors and instead said he would put the trial on the fast track. He had scheduled yesterday’s motion hearing and a July 11 trial. Instead that July 11 date will now be used for the cross motions for summary judgment.
Each side must file motions July 7 and will be able to make oral arguments July 11, Tennant said.
The suit alleges that the Interior Department circumvented Carcieri to approve the tribe’s land application by using a definition of “Indian” and “reservation” that doesn’t fit the Mashpee tribe.
“The Mashpees did not meet their burden to prove that they were tribally organized and exercised tribal jurisdiction over their lands and people in 1934, much less that they were recognized by the federal government for doing so and fell under federal jurisdiction in 1934,” the suit states.
Interior’s record of decision points to the tribe’s historic ties to both Mashpee and Taunton and finds that the tribe members meet the second definition of “Indian” — descendants of a recognized Indian tribe — and that the tribe’s “continued control and occupation” of Mashpee as of 1934 constitutes a reservation.
The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe is not a party to the suit because it targets the Interior Department’s decision. Still, the tribe has a keen interest in the outcome.
In September, the Interior Department agreed to take land in trust in Taunton and Mashpee for the tribe’s initial reservation. The tribe has begun construction of First Light Resort & Casino in Taunton and has targeted next summer to open phase one of the Indian casino.
Plans for the casino, which will cost an estimated $600 million to build, include three hotels, a gaming room with 3,000 slot machines, 150 table games and 40 poker tables. The first phase is expected to feature a gambling floor with about 1,900 slot machines, 60 table games, and some restaurants.

http://www.capecodtimes.com/news/20160629/judge-narrows-focus-of-suit-brought-by-casino-foes


Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Big gamble: How families are suffering as men lose millions to sports betting




Big gamble: How families are suffering as men lose millions to sports betting

By Gardy Chacha | Monday, Jun 27th 2016 

Betting has taken a toll on many families in Kenya     Photo:Shutterstock
Sport betting is the latest scourge stealing happiness out of marriages and throwing relationships over the cliff. This is an industry valued at more than Sh5 billion by Betting Control and Licensing Board and through which men lose millions of shillings daily.
So far this year; a man in Eldoret committed suicide, leaving his family behind, after losing Sh45,000 which he had borrowed as loan from Kenya Commercial Bank. Kennedy Kosgei, it was reported, borrowed the sum to place as a wager on a match between Spanish football clubs Real Madrid and Atletico Madrid.
Real lost to Atletico, a topsy-turvy result for Kosgei, who had predicted a win for Real. Kosgei was later found dangling from a tree, lifeless.

“He was clearly devastated. I believe his intention was to win more money so that he could use the profits to attend to household needs. But he lost and he just couldn’t face his wife and family to tell them his misfortune,” comments David Otiato, a married sports fan himself.
Why Kosgei put Sh45,000 on the line is a secret that will forever remain with him in the grave.
Later, a gambler, John Muchanga, went berserk and slashed to death two managers of a casino after he had gambled and lost Sh30,000 in Nairobi’s Eastleigh estate. The man was, however, confronted and killed by a mob as he tried to attack a third person. All the three could be the sole bread winners to their families.
Genesis of betting craze
However, a quick survey Crazy Monday conducted from the streets of Nairobi indicates that many sport betting clients suffer illusions of grandeur, a scenario that is made worse by harsh economic times and high rates of joblessness.
“I saw on TV a couple who won Sh22 million and I just couldn’t stop fantasizing about winning such amounts. My life would change instantly. I would have a lot of money to buy land and build a mansion. Buying food would be light work,” Josiah Wanyama, an ardent AFC Leopards fan tells Crazy Monday.
Titus Osanjo, a self-confessed football addict, believes that sports was primarily consumed by fans as a form of entertainment. Hear him: “Betting has monetised sports. Now fans are shifting focus towards making quick bucks.”
Allure of quick cash
The allure of quick cash, made with nearly zilch calorie expenditure, is no doubt irresistible to many. “The betting companies have taken advantage of the human desire for riches,” observes Ken Andika, a frequent gambler. “I have lost so much money myself that I feel like I am depressed throughout the weeks.”
Andika works at a loading and offloading section of a shop owned by an Indian along River Road, Nairobi. The first time he tried it out the team that he had vouched for won and with it he received Sh3,000.
“From then on I couldn’t stop playing,” he says. Unbeknown to him Andika, who earns a meagre Sh8,000 at the end of the month and lives with a wife and two children in Mathare, was nonchalantly walking into gambling addiction. A spate of losses later the gambling took a toll on his life, family and marriage, sending the middle aged man tumbling towards insanity.
“Sometimes I used half of my salary to bet. I could walk to work and save the fare – just so that I could place a bet. If I had exhausted all options I would borrow from friends. The funny thing is every time I lost I felt like playing again to win back what I had lost.” 
Andika has never recovered his lost money. Instead he kept losing. First, his friends deserted him – at least those who lent him the hundreds when he cooed, promising to pay back at end month, and never meeting his end of the bargain. Then the warm welcome his wife treated him to back home dissipated like magic fog.
His wife stopped warming bath water for him. She grew reclusive and distant.
Stealing wives’ money
“I struggle – worse than I did before – to put food on the table. My wife does not want to understand. She despises me and tells me I am no longer a man,” he says.
Andika has spent thousands betting for wins and losses and has mostly enjoyed the latter. It is an ordeal that has put a wedge between him and those in his life. His marriage, he says, is practically over as his wife, since last month, has repeatedly shunned bedroom overtures and has covered herself in impregnable garbs that Andika can’t get past.
“We put up with a lot of nonsense from husbands. But when it reaches a point where they are ‘stealing’ from their wives, or from the family coffers to gamble, it is time the wives say it is enough,” states Millicent Kabuchi, a marketer for a leading telecommunications firm in Nairobi.
Millicent herself is not married and is merely reacting to reports that sports betting is leading many fanatics into financial problems worse than the Greek recession.
“A man should first make sure that everything at home is attended to and that the family is well taken care of.
He can then use whatever silvers left to place bets. Any man using money that is otherwise supposed to pay school fees for their children or pay rent for the house is deranged and does not deserve a woman’s affection,” comments Sheila Wacira, a married mother of three, the sneer on her face suggesting complete disgust.
Catherine Mbau is a psychologist at Arise Counselling centre in Nairobi.She says that sport betting is a form of gambling, which, like any other kind of gambling, can be addictive, “at which point it becomes trouble”.
“First, players are lured by the possibility of millions. It gives them a certain high to place a few hundreds or thousands in return for possible millions.” The truth is betting companies are in business – the more players lose the better for them,” Mbau says.
Yes! The allure has all the hallmarks of a Ponzi scheme; a hypnotising fetish that eventually consumes dreams whole.
As for the strife betting is putting on marriages and relationships, Mbau points out that spouses who have lost money through betting lose their partners’ trust because, in most instances, the offending spouse bets alone without discussing it out.
Unmet financial obligations
“The health of marriage depends very much on healthy communication. If one of you is risking money that belongs to the family, money that the family depends on, then it is only proper that a couple discusses it. If betting is done in secret then trust within the relationship is broken,” she admonishes. 
This year it was also reported that a 42-year-old banker lost Sh500,000 that he had borrowed to bet on the same match as Kennedy Kosgei.
From what we have learnt, betting losses come in twos, and so the man also lost his marriage when his wife decided to pack up and flee from his humongous self-inflicted debt.
The former Betting Control and Licensing Board chairman chairman Prof Paul Wambua Musili had alluded before that betting carries potential harm to the consumers and their families.
Betting companies, through terms and conditions drafted in microscopic fonts, also advise clients to place wagers with money they can afford to lose.
Men who stop working to bet fulltime
Tales abound of men who have abandoned their work to bet fulltime. However, the responsibility of the amount one bets rests with the player and the company is not liable.
“Bet for fun but it should not be taken as a fulltime economic activity,” Musili said
Sports betting, since the registration of the first online sports betting company in 2013, has pervaded Kenyans’ lives. The winners are paraded by the same betting companies through various media, attracting more wishful players.
Behind the fa├žade though many relationships are taking a hit.
Moses Omwayo, another victim whose story got media attention, and a Maseno University student, lost Sh40,000 loaned to him by the Higher Education Loans Board.
Like Mose, Douglas Kinoti, a university student in Nairobi, won’t be attending lectures this semester after he lost Sh25,000 (given to him by his parents to pay fees) he had placed two months ago.
His girlfriend – a lady he says has expensive taste – has taken off and moved on into another relationship with a hunk whose pocket has no dents – at least not from gambling.
“The girl can go,” he says. “What I am worried about is my parents. They are yet to find out. They think I am in school when I am just shacking at a friend’s.”
Kinoti believes that his mother may forgive him but his father (who works hard in the miraa business) could consider denouncing him as his son. 


SPORT, CORRUPTION AND THE CRIMINAL LAW: THE NEED FOR AN EXPERT INVESTIGATIVE BODY




SPORT, CORRUPTION AND THE CRIMINAL LAW: THE NEED FOR AN EXPERT INVESTIGATIVE BODY

Baseball_Catcher_Crouched











Published 28 June 2016 | Authored by: Tim Owen QC


On October 2nd 1919, the opening day of Game One in the World Series, the Philadelphia Bulletin published a poem whose central theme would soon seem slightly wide of the mark:
Still it really doesn’t matter
After all, who wins the flag.
Good clean sport is what we’re after,
And we aim to make our brag
To each near or distant nation
Whereon shines the sporting sun
That of all our games gymnastic
Baseball is the cleanest one!
A year later, eight members of the Chicago White Sox (including star hitter Shoeless” Joe Jackson) and five gamblers were indicted by a grand jury on charges of conspiracy to defraud.1The allegation was that an organised criminal gang, headed by Arnold “The Brain” Rothstein, had paid members of the White Sox deliberately to lose the World Series to the Cincinnati Reds. The Sox had been the hot favourites and the bizarre circumstances of their defeat (pitcher Claude “Lefty” Williams lost three games all on his own, a Series record, and many others made numerous fielding errors) strongly suggested that simple stage fright was not the explanation.
After a trial in 1921, all eight White Sox players and the gamblers were acquitted. But the very next day newly appointed National Commissioner of Baseball, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, announced his decision to ban the White Sox eight for life from Major League baseball on the basis that, while they may have been acquitted in court, no one could dispute they had broken the rules of baseball. This high profile criminal prosecution of some of baseball’s most famous players followed by firm action by the sport’s regulator succeeded in all but eliminating the problem of illegal gambling in baseball for decades. The moral of the story is clear. Resort to the criminal law when evidence of corruption in sport emerges can be the most effective deterrent in the regulatory toolbox.
More recently the US Department of Justice demonstrated its determination to tackle the stench of corruption that has long emanated from FIFA. Since marching into the Baur au Lac hotel in Zurich early one May morning last year and arresting a string of FIFA officials on corruption charges, a long list of current and former football executives have been indicted on some 92 charges alleging racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies.
Last December former Concacaf President Jeffrey Webb pleaded guilty to money laundering, wire fraud and racketeering and agreed to forfeit $6.7m. Of the 92 counts, allegations include embezzlement of funds by Webb and Jack Warner provided by FIFA for disaster relief as well as embezzlement of funds from FIFA’s Goal programme intended for developing youth academies and infrastructure in the poorest regions. A more recent 236 page indictment2 alleges that some 27 defendants engaged in various schemes involved in selling lucrative media and marketing rights to football tournaments and matches. US attorney general Loretta Lynch said in the wake of the May 2015 raid that:
"[T]he betrayal of trust set forth here is outrageous. The scale of corruption alleged herein is unconscionable. And the message from this announcement should be clear to every culpable individual who remains in the shadows, hoping to evade our investigation. You will not wait us out; you will not escape our focus."2
It can reasonably be assumed that the FBI’s bold and decisive action, in the wake of a three year investigation, will have a major deterrent effect on those who achieve high office in the world of football regardless of the outcome in the forthcoming criminal trial process. It can equally be assumed that anyone intending to engage in illegal gambling or other forms of corrupt behavior in relation to sporting events in the UK or elsewhere has little to fear from the criminal law of England and Wales in light of the striking failure of the police and prosecuting authorities to bring cases of corrupt betting and match fixing before the courts.
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